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10/19/01
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PHS Bulldogs On-Line
Oct 19, 2001
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4 Bulldog alumni notes and more scores today:
Irma Kulp Zacher (60)
Charles E. Olsen (66)
Paul Case (67)
Cliff Brown (67)

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Volleyball (10/16): Pasco 3 - Kennewick 2
Bulldogs are 11 - 2

Girls Soccer (10/18): Pasco 1 - Eisenhower 0
Bulldogs are 6 - 3

Football (10/19): Pasco 28 - Moses Lake 17
Allen Ailep: 34 carries for 276 yards
Bulldogs are 7 - 0

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From: Irma Kulp Zacher (60)

  Tell Nell Fleming Van Lear to get a computer and get on line so we can fill her with good wishes. She is a wonderfully good soul and caretaker for her invalid husband.

Irma Kulp Zacher (60)
Pasco, WA
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From: Charles E. Olsen (66)

  To Ginger Mitchell Wedin:
  Good work Ginger! I haven't done anything so ambitious since '78. I went up to Dawson Creek, BC and came back through Alberta and Montana. I got home after 2400 bike miles for the 4th of July. I keep thinking I will do some traveling again. It hasn't happened though.
  I think Harvey Houston is in Richland though I don't remember if I caught up with him or not.

Charles E. Olsen (66)
Newnan, GA
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From: Paul Case (67)

  To all PHS Bulldogs On-Line subscribers:
  I was considering adding search capabilities to the web site so people could search the archived Bulldog notes for entries from a particular person, for a specific subject, etc. But web search engines can be a little tricky, and sometimes costly, especially if you only know enough about Internet publishing to be dangerous - like me! Then I looked closer at the features offered by the Google search engine folks at http://www.google.com/. Google is a great search engine and it offers some unique features, such as the ability to search a single Internet site, like PHS Bulldogs On-Line. I may be the last person to know about this, but if I'm only the next-to-last, at least one more person will know and may find the site-specific search feature helpful.
  The Google toolbar is free, but it's only advertised as working with Microsoft Windows (95, 98, ME, NT, or 2000) and Microsoft Internet Explorer (5.0 or 5.5) Doubtful it will work with Netscape or AOL, but I suppose you could give it a try if you're brave. Let us know the results if you try. If you want to add this to your browser, go to the Google site shown above, select Google Toolbar and follow the instructions to install.
  I hope some of you will find this helpful.

Bulldogs football team is still ranked #1 in the state. I think I also read that they are ranked #10 in the USA Today Western Region.

Paul Case (67)
Pasco, WA
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From: Cliff Brown (67)

  For those who were in boy scouts:
  The scout ranch an early introduction to the mysticism of fraternal ceremonies. Some of this was actually part of the award ceremonies for the scouts, but most of it was part of the major big deal: Order of the Arrow.
  OA, as we called it, was reserved for the truly dedicated and experienced scouts, or at least for those who could pass for that. Every year, at the summer camp, a large circle was formed one evening around a campfire. I mean this was one serious big campfire. Every troop in Southeastern Washington and many from Northwest Oregon seemed to be there. The circle was probably 50 yards across. The fire was high and the night was dark, and we could basically only focus on the blazing flames. Then this small group of scouts dressed up in full Indian regalia started walking around the outside of the circle to a steady drum beat. We didn't watch them, focusing only on the fire -- at least if we followed instructions. It was too dark outside the circle to see much anyway. The bells on their feet would stop every now and then along with the drum beats. Then you would hear three loud slaps as one of the Indians whomped on the shoulder of one of the scouts who was thus being "tapped" for Order of the Arrow. At that point, the tappee would be blindfolded and fall in behind the group. Out of maybe two hundred scouts, perhaps 10 or 15 would be so chosen. The tappees were led off and indoctrinated in some of the basics of the OA, and then for the next 24 hours they had to maintain strict silence while going about their chores. Then later in the week there was another swearing in ceremony at which only the admitted braves would participate. I can't remember much about that, but I do remember it was a bigger deal than the Eagle badge. One fun part came when we got back to Pasco. We were specialists in Indian garb and clothing by then. We could dress up the part with the best Western imitators around. So when we heard there was a reenactment of the Oregon trail, which gets popular from time to time around the Northwest, we decided the least we could do was to stage a phony Indian raid on the group.
  These recreations of actual covered wagon trips are a big business in the West. I didn't realize exactly how big until years later when I took my kids on one. The trips consist generally of some promoters advertising for participants from the local communities along the way, and then using the entrance fees to hire a few wagon drivers and horses, and perhaps throw in some food and drink and
some professional comedians to entertain at the nightly campfires -- which are heavily interspersed with pitches to join them on the next one. All involved, both paying customers and the large group of taggers-on who have figured out that you don't really need to pay the entrance fee since nobody takes roll, troop off across the prairie, which by this time has plenty of paved roads and irrigation canals and bridges to cross rivers, and railway beds and good dirt roads to follow, and all in all involves crossing a territory which is totally devoid of hardships. But they do camp out and pretend to relive the life of the pioneers. It is as much as anything a chance for urban and semi urban cowboys to show off their horse trailers and vans as it is a chance to relive history.
  So one morning, somewhere between Pasco and Wallula gap, settled in between some sand dunes, this quiet camp of nostalgic urban cowpeople and pioneer imitators was awoken by a screaming tribe of teen age boys riding horses and hell bent to create panic among the hung over and dreary-eyed, stumbling out of their tents to see what the hell was causing all the noise. We were dressed in full war paint, complete with revealing breach cloths and scanty underwear. And we wanted very much to recreate at least one Indian rape scene -- or what would appear to be one to the TV cameras we had carefully notified.
  The pioneers were not well armed. We, however, came with real bows and arrows and spears and hatchets. We were careful not to actually use them against people, but tents were fair game. We generally rode through the camp vandalizing what we could without too much damage. We tried hard to actually sweep up onto horseback any light enough looking girls who were running about in nightclothes. I think one of our group actually managed to get one on board -- or at least to scream very loud when she thought it actually might happen. It was all basically good fun. Even the pioneers quickly figured that out. The TV cameras had a field day, and we appeared on the nightly local news later that week.

Cliff Brown (67)
Bogota, Colombia
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