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7/8/01
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PHS Bulldogs On-Line   Jul 08, 2001
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6 Bulldog alumni notes today:
Irma Kulp Zacher (60)
Sandra Green Reuther (63)
Marcia Myers (63)
Rick Givan (63)
Jeff Arbogast (67)
Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)

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From: Irma Kulp Zacher (60)

Great replies to my questions and quotes.

Update: I just attended (today) a 'PHS 60s' post-function, at the Pasco Bulldog Inn at Road 28 (for cool libations & boasts of golfing scores). Many very hot (out in the 100 degree Pasco heat) golfers, spouses & friends doing their now annual PHS Class of '60 Golf Tournament: Bev (Hampton) Wardlow & Ron, Phyllis (Shinker) & Bill, Donna (Nelson) Steiner & Terry, Char (Peot) Kison, Paul Kison, Dennis Trimble, Judy (Geil) Bughi & Mike, Judy (Prefontaine), Nancy Jameson Burleigh, Dick Sanger, Dick Kurz, Larry Gregory, Floyd Allen & Kathy, Sally (Myers) Merriman & Jack, Ron Schultz & Marie. I'm sure I missed some names, but this just goes to show you the friendships of the PHS Bulldogs goes on and on. We have our '60s Class Reunions every 5 years. We really have a great time.

I passed this site address around today, hoping others would reply. I did get some interesting comments, such as: Remember Wilke's Drive in East Pasco across from the Old Whittier School (now torn down). Ron Schultz said he remembers when someone put rocks in the hubcabs of Sergeant Carter's police car (in late 50s). Someone else recalled Jack Stredwick...Pasco Police used to stop them and tell them to do their drinking at the sand dunes, not on the Pasco Streets. It was also said...police didn't use to throw you in jail for drinking...they just took you home to your folks and you were in worse trouble. Schultz said he can remember some drag racing down Wernett Road. (Sure glad they don't do that now, as that's where we live).

Irma Kulp Zacher (60)
Pasco, WA
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From: Sandra Green Reuther (63)

Jeanine Updyke (PHS '63) and her husband Don Peyton are visiting us in Boulder City on their way up to Pasco, etc. from their home in Albuquerque. Don graduated from Benton City in 1963 although he went through grade school in Richland.   Don was into music back in the 60s. He played at a place where Buddy Derrick's group was also playing. He also remembers our Jim Jones who played guitar. Don and his group, The DDT's (Don, Dan, and Tom) played at the CBC Hootennanny in the winter if 1964.

In the 80's while living in the Tri-Cities, Don played in groups with Warren Tate (Joe Trout and the Flounders), the Jack Jones Trio, and the Coffee Twins and the Satins.

Don played in lots of venues including the Hanford House, Meadow Springs Country Club, Moose, etc. He brought his guitar in this afternoon and played some nice tunes for us. He's going to play for the retirement home where his mother is at - when they get to Kennewick.

Did anyone see Don other than me at the Hootennanny?

I figure some of you other musician might want to chime in about some of the groups and locations you played in/at.

Sandra Green Reuther (63)
Boulder City, NV
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From: Marcia Myers (63)

Thanks for clearing that up Paul, as to who set this site up.

To Irma Zacher:

Irma, Bingham Hot Springs is where you and my sister and all those other grand co-horts of the Class of 1960 went for your sneak. I have some quite wonderful pictures of a sneak there - my Dad and his senior class from Columbia High School in Burbank/Wallula all those years ago. I felt so cheated that yours was the last sneak ever at PHS. I had so counted on getting to go. Have no idea whether the hot springs still exist - looked in the atlas but nothing listed.

I never went to the sand dunes under the conditions the rest of you seem to, I seem to have led a somewhat cloistered life but I did go there on hayrides with the Jr. Posse and for Theta Rho Girls.

Irma, you mentioned a Ron Collins. Any relation to Bob Collins who married Llonna Beale? Llonna's on the list of the missing and I can't seem to get any answers about what happened to her. Any help anyone can lend will be mucho appreciated. Thanks.

Marcia Myers (63)
Vancouver, WA
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From: Rick Givan (63)

When I was a kid I lived and breathed baseball, from Little League to baseball cards to Sanders Field. My Grandfather introduced me to the game. He owned an appliance store on Kennewick Ave. (Home Electric and Appliance) in downtown Kennewick. He'd take me to Tri-City Braves games at Sanders Field in the Highlands, where he had box seats, as well a a sign with his store name and logo painted on the fence in right field. I was proud of that.

When the Mid-Columbia Library Bookmobile would come booming around (it had a great P.A. system announcing its arrival) to our place on Hopkins St. off 24th near the river, I'd always check out Duane Decker's baseball series on the fictional Blue Sox. My favorite was titled "Good Field, No Hit", since that most approximated my own baseball skills.

Our Little League games were at Memorial Park, not far from the pool. (Maybe they still are. If so please forgive me for stating the obvious. I haven't been back to the area for years). Wally Brown directed the program. We didn't have uniforms, just T-shirts and caps. I recall playing for Mercier's Shell one year, and VFW another. When we'd win a game, we'd walk to the Shell station on Lewis, where we'd get a free Coke, and could hang around the grease rack for a while. VFW gave us a Coke for winning too, but it was in a highball glass, with plenty of ice. We weren't allowed into the place. They'd bring the Cokes up the stairs from the bar to us on the sidewalk across from the old post office. From time-to-time some of the old WW-1 boys in for a matinee eye-opener would come up, give us attaboys, and regale, then bore, us with ancient baseball stories.

The games were played mostly in the mornings, because of the Pasco heat. My Dad and Grandpa saw me play in only one game each (they were on vacation). No parental catcalls or threats to take action in those days. They let us play.

I remember being psyched out by a lanky pitcher named Ron Dupuis who threw smoke (with me it could've been wisps). But the thing I recall best about him was he was the fastest I'd ever seen at folding his hat up over the brim and stuffing it in his back pocket before he put his batting helmet on.

The afternoons may have been scorching, but some of us continued playing neighborhood ball. In our enclave, bordered by the dike and the blue bridge ramp, Jerry, Don and Johnny Hardy and I appreciated Dave Admire's Dad, who built us a small field in their back lot, complete with dugouts and a small bleacher. Don was the only who could hit one out over the shed in left, but the rest of us honed our fielding skills on the rocky infield.

The saga would continue at night at Sanders Field, where we'd try to focus on our Braves heroes, Vern Kinds father, Milt May and, my favorite, Danny Holden. We were distracted only by Sno-Cones and the lady from Connell with the ear-splitting cowbells.

My folks both worked, Dad at Hanford and Mom at SeaFirst, so we had a succession of babysitters, primarily African-American ladies. One of them was dating Ellis "Bones" Burton of the Braves. When he'd come to visit her at our house, it was the most popular place in the area. He'd get us passes to the clubhouse. One time I got to be Braves batboy in an exhibition game with the Hollywood Stars of the old PCL (the Dodgers and Giants were still in New York). It was a thrill. Burton made it to the Majors for a few seasons with the Cards and Cubs.

Even in high school I'd go to games with Grandpa. He loved me like nobody else; I'd been his first grandchild. The day I came East to join the Teacher Corps in '68, everyone came to my folks place (on Ruby by then, between 34 and 36) to say goodbye. I left them all in the living room, and headed for my little red sports car. As I reached for the door, I felt a hand on my shoulder. It was Grandpa. He'd come out alone. He looked away and said, "Kinda wish you weren't goin'". I protested, "Hey Grandpa, it's only a two year program. I'll be back." He looked me in the eye with such affectionate sadness and said, "I don't think so". He was right. While I visited a number of times before he died in '78, it wasn't quite the same. But I've never forgotten that look.

He gave me an affection for baseball, taught me the importance of being a stand-up guy, and still loved me when I was bad. Whether I'm mediating a custody dispute, or reflecting on my own experience, I'm reminded, Grandparents are important.

Rick Givan (63)
Cabot, PA
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From: Jeff Arbogast (67)

Just a little info from the past. Can you say Beer Falls, the Bob A Lou, Jumbo Drive-In, Mary's Doghouse in Kennewick, Wilkies In and Out, the Tic-Tok, T-C Sports, and Hubs Grocery? J C Penneys and Sears were all in Pasco. How about Yamauchi Hill? Lots of history out there.

Jeff Arbogast (67)
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From: Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)

I had two cousins who attended PHS also. Ray Eads (class of 64?) and his brother Steve Eads (class of 68). Steve now lives in Australia and Ray is in Woodinville Washington. Both are very successful and I have sent this to them in the hopes they will write a few memories down for us all. I am enjoying all the letters and updates so much. I hope we continue to enlarge this space and everyone keeps passing the address on.....

Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)
Kennewick, WA
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