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3/22/02
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PHS Bulldogs On-Line
Mar 22, 2002
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7 Bulldogs, 1 Bomber, & a couple announcements today:
Carol Haddox Cubilie (62)
Karon Mc Culloch (62)
Dick Brown (64)
Mercedes (Deedee) Willox Loiseau (64RHS)
Sheldon Spadafore (65)
Scott Labberton (67)
Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)
Michael Williams (70)

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PHS Bulldogs On-Line Announcements:
There is a new e-mail address to send Bulldog notes to:


I have to do some R&R (repairs/remodel) to the PHS Bulldogs On-Line alumni web site, so I don't know for sure when it will be updated with the latest archived newsletters, etc. I welcome ideas & suggestions for the web site, but keep in mind that this is a part-time job! - Paul
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Reunion Announcement (from classmates.com):
Class of 1962 40-year Reunion
Organizer: JEAN BISHOP
When:    Aug 16, 17, 18, 2002
Details:  Fri. 8/16 Garden Party at Doyle Clapper's
              Sat. 8/17 Golf Scrambler in a.m.; Dinner/Dance in p.m.
              Sun. 8/18 Fond Farewell at The Hut
Where:  WestCoast (Doubletree) N. 20th Pasco, WA 99301
Cost:  $90/couple, $50/single (includes photo)
You can get additional info on the PHS Bulldogs 1962 web site at http://62bulldogs.com/

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From: Carol Haddox Cubilie (62)

  Do Tana Candee and Terry Zier remember playing baseball with Neal Phillips and the 3 Haddox girls in the empty lot next to Neal's house? Also digging forts and tunnels in that lot? And I do remember Tana and Terry coming over to play Tarzan in the back yard on the outdoor fireplace barbeque. Also, in the summer time, kids from several blocks all around playing hide and seek after dark all over the block. Ah, for the good old days.
  I never sold spudnuts but sure did eat a lot of them. Dennis Large, from Richland, my first husband, worked at the shop in Richland for a couple years. Still can eat half a dozen at one sitting when they are nice and warm!!! Am certainly looking forward to the reunion.

Carol Haddox Cubilie (62)
Redmond, WA
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From: Karon Mc Culloch (62)

  Just thought the marble aficionados from the 50s and 60s might like to know that marbles are alive and well on the wet side of the mountains. I have a bunch that I put in a large glass vase that my almost 4-year-old granddaughter loves to play with. And, this morning's Seattle Times has an article, part of which follows:

"10th annual SeaTac Marble Collectors Show, which is expected to draw about 300 orb enthusiasts to the Sea-Tac Holiday Inn over its four days. It began Wednesday and is open to the public tomorrow (Saturday) only. Admission is $5, and kids 12 and under can roll in for free.

"The marble's sphere of influence isn't what it was in the `50s, when every self-respecting boy and plenty of girls knew their aggies, steelies, cat's-eyes, shooters and boulders. The low-tech toys haven't fared well against video games and TV. Collectors these days tend to be middle-age guys, spending from $1 to $5,000 per marble.

"The Sea-Tac Marble Collectors Club, which Van Dyke heads, boasts about 200 active members, while the Trumbull, Connecticut-based Marble Collectors Society of America claims about 2,100."

Karon Mc Culloch (62)
Federal Way, WA
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From: Dick Brown (64)

To Dave Whitmire:
  That game with the knife and the stretching was called just that STRETCH. I think the champion in our area was Terry Phillips all 6'2"of him in 5th grade.

To Ron Dupuis:
  I think that anyone that went to P.H.S. had trouble with the spelling and the gramer dept. What a good time we had in high school, I feel sorry for the kids today.
  At Jerry Penny's funeral I spoke of the wonderful times we had on the streets of Pasco and sometimes Kenn. But never that far away place - Richland. I remember many times when you senior boys would take us soph boys along with you and how good of times those were. We learned all our craziness from you older gentlemen. We all lost a good friend when Jerry passed away, he will be missed. Now there was one wild and crazy guy.

    My wife Vicki Jones (63) tells of the times living on 20th Street across from the now Bingo Place (the old Safeway store), the wind would blow the sand up on the porch and block the front door where it would not open, have to shovel it off the front steps. Now that is blowing.

  Does anyone know where Bill Keller, class of 62 is?


Dick Brown (64)
Kennewick, WA
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From: Mercedes (Deedee) Willox Loiseau (64RHS)

To Gary Baumgartner (62):
  Thanks for the URL to all the photos of Hanford, Richland, and Pasco. I enjoyed seeing all the old pics (before I was born, actually, but my dad was there with my mom and sis).
  Seeing the old train depot, I realize it never changed much. I worked there in 1968 (I think) and again in 1982.

  Are you the Gary Baumgartner that worked for Northern Pacific/Burlington Northern?

Mercedes (Deedee) Willox Loiseau (64RHS)
Burbank, WA
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From: Sheldon Spadafore (65)

To Melinda Smathers Dupuis:
  Was that "Mumbly Peg"? At least that is what we called it back then....   Way back then...

Cheers for the year of 1965.

Regards -

Sheldon Spadafore (65)
Booragul, New South Wales, Australia
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From: Scott Labberton (67)

To Cliff Brown:
  I remember debate class of 66 and 67. Poor Mr. Johnson was intimidated and outmatched. I seem to remember, it was his first teaching job. I remember the second year with most of the same classmates. He started it with the announcement that it was going to be different (he was going to be in charge). But, that only challenged us to make sure it didn't happen.
  I remember several proclamations by the class of "research days." Everyone would suddenly sweep out of the classroom to go to the library. Sometimes we even showed up there. Once, we even declared we were going to the public library! He stopped going with us to make sure we stayed because he didn't want to face the librarian (was her name Mrs. Madsen?).
  I seem to remember it was you I left the building with on Senior Sneak. We were in debate and went down the hall to the stairway. We decided to take a shortcut by hopping over the railing and onto the landing. As we turned around toward the office (which was just up the hall), there was Mr. Gregson standing about twenty feet away. He looked at us and said, "This is what we are sending out on the world?", turned and walked off! As it wasn't much of a sneak, I got a few days detention (cleaning up metal filing in the shop). That was the only time I seem to remember getting in trouble in high school except...
  I was much better at staying out of trouble, although it was luck, not good behavior. Mrs. Douglas' senior English class had a student teacher who was given her time alone with the class. The first thing she did was change her attitude. She began each class by "calling us to order" by ringing a bell. Everyone resented this condescending approach. One day as I passed I saw the bell setting on top of the row of books along the front of her desk. It took only a second to place the bell in front of the books. This placed it out of her sight, but in view of the
entire class. When she went to call the class to order (an unneeded exercise) the look of dismay and frustration on her face was obvious. She tried to appear non-plussed as she rifled drawers, walked around the classroom, and looked everywhere for the bell. We all knew the hated routine, so we all knew what she was looking for. Most of us had spotted the bell in plain sight, but no one was going to tell her where it was. She finally decided Mike Curtis had taken it (his desk was closest to hers). He was sitting right in front of the bell, but all he would say was that he had not taken her bell. She never did find it that day, although it was in plain sight when she was going around looking under everyone else's desk. The bell disappeared from in front of the books, but she never used it again.

  I also confess to being "the phantom" of Mrs. Gregson's sociology class. The class was in the Ag room, and we had tables in a u-shape, not desks. Because I was at the corner of the u it was easy during test time to get an extra test card. I would fill it out randomly and mark the name as "the phantom." When the tests were collected I would stick it somewhere else in the pile. After the second test she confronted the class, but she was so dramatic in her approach that her accusations were vague and no one knew what she was talking about. She never mentioned the tests, just that there was a "mystery." She threatened everyone, "We have your fingerprints!" She finally turned around and blurted "Greg Marks, are you the phantom?!" Greg, nor anyone else, had the faintest clue what she was talking about, because I hadn't shared my game with anyone. They didn't know who the phantom was, or what he/she was supposed to have done. It must have been serious though, because she was making quite a fuss. Not to be stopped, I got test cards from another class, and "the phantom" continued to take every test for the rest of the year. I don't know if anyone else remembers this, because not much mention was made of it again, but she was always trying to be watchful at test time, and would frequently ask students if she had given them more then one test card.

Scott Labberton (67)
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From: Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)

  I have another memory to include for the girls . . . remember hopscotch? You had your absolute favorite (chain) as your marker . . . I think girls tried to outdo each other on their chains. I know it was very important to me! Do you also remember the carnivals at the grade schools to make money? I remember (fishing) for some cute little toy. A clothespin on the end of a fishing pole brought my surprise to me!  Also, the cake walks, beanbag toss, etc . . . what fun . . . I went to Captain Gray and chased many boys out on the playground . . .

Le'Ann McAllister Cherry (67)
Kennewick, WA
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From: Michael Williams (70)

To Dave Whitmire:
  I enjoyed hearing your missives about school yard games. As an international school headmaster, and elementary principal of some 17 years of experience, I can tell you that the games kids play today are very different from our times. Although mumblie peg is not played on our campus in Shanghai, some of the old time games are still played, like Chinese jump rope, four square, and bump on the basketball court. Except in our P.E. classes, I've not seen much dodgeball, one that I always enjoyed, and marbles, seem to be a thing of the past. Replaced by Pokemons, and digital games, these seem to have been moved to the "lost art" files.

To Paul Whitemarsh:
  You've got to be the bro of Dave, who was in my class of `70, and I remember you living just a block off of the school field off of, was it Lucas St. Didn't Greg Mercer live across the street from you? I remembered you to be a tall drink of water, that us younger guys tried to steer clear of. Where is your brother, Dave? And why is he not contributing memories to this site from the class of `70? It's a lonely world out her from our class, and you guys from the `60's are dominating.

Michael Williams (70)
Shanghai, China
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