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3/20/02
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PHS Bulldogs On-Line
Mar 20, 2002
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5 Bulldog notes today:
Ron Dupuis (62)
Gary Baumgartner (62)
Paul Whitemarsh (65)
Melinda Smathers Dupuis (65)
Marcia Bailie Plows (66)

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From: Ron Dupuis (62)

  Hello fellow Bulldogs. It has been great fun reading all the messages from everyone. You will have to excuse my lack of grammatical correctness, but English and grammar were never my strong suit. In fact, I don't know of too many subjects that were my strong suit. You know what I will never miss in the Tri-Cities is a dust storm. I am sure that many of you can remember and still experience the nasty dust storms that can blow through there. I remember when we first moved into our house and the dust and sand would blow into the yard. I'll bet the yard was built up a good six inches over the years just because of all the sand that blew in from the wind and the lack of development. I will never forget one time the neighbor across the street was painting his house (white) and had just finished one side of the house when a dust storm hit. By the time the dust had cleared the side of his house was a sandy brown where the dirt had stuck to the nice wet paint. Even to this day I have been golfing out at Sun Willows and have experienced terrific winds and dust. I don't think there is quite the dirt in the air that there used to be but I could be wrong.

Ron Dupuis (62)
Snohomish, WA
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From: Gary Baumgartner (62)

To Paul Case:
  You should check out web site http://www.hanford.gov/doe/culres/photos/ This has several old photos of Richland and Pasco, even one of the old hotel next to the Depot Lunch, a.k.a. The Bitter Inn.

Gary Baumgartner (62)
Kennewick, WA
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From: Paul Whitemarsh (65)

To Lois Benson Kincaid:
  I heard Doc tell this story himself, but I don't remember all the details. It had to do with a high school athletic trip (baseball, I think) to Pendleton, OR. Somehow Doc and some other guys got crosswise with Mr. Gregson, the no-nonsense Colonel, and he put them off the bus in Pendleton to fend for themselves. To call their parents or whatever.
  What they did was somehow hook up with a gentleman heading to Pasco. Hitching a ride from this guy they ended up beating the bus back to town, and I think even met the bus when it pulled up to the school. You could get the specifics from Doc or just go with what I recall, it is close enough to get him going. Maybe you can tie that into an introduction of his political savvy or can-do abilities. I hope that gives you something to work with.

Paul Whitemarsh (65)
Pasco, WA
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From: Melinda Smathers Dupuis (65)

For Dave Whitmire:
  I remember playing the pocketknife game with my brother, Dean, and his friends when we still lived in Prosser. We called it "chicken." And we all had a few close shaves on the shoes and bare toes a few times. That was really being brave. Well, brave then. Stupid now.

Melinda Smathers Dupuis (65)
Snohomish, WA
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From: Marcia Bailie Plows (66)

  In answer to Dave Whitmire's game memories. I can remember being in elementary school (either Emerson, or Mark Twain) and going out to the play ground with my steelies. Knocked off a bunch of boys and got some really prized cat-eyes. I don't remember any other girls playing marbles. I did have an advantage . . my dad owned taverns and pinball machines. I had an unlimited supply of steelies. Let me tell you that at age 7 or 8 a girl can have about anything when she has a endless supply of steelies. I ended up with quite a nice collection of marbles. I'm not sure whatever happened to them, but I have been accused of losing them on a number of occasions.
Ha Ha!   I too have fond memories of RedRover RedRover, but hopscotch and jump rope were what most girls did. Double dutch at high speed.
  If you checked out the baseball and bat then some boys would play softball with us, but most of the time there was self-segregation between boys and girls.
  It is good to know that some of the games are still being played. Thanks, Dave, for bringing up more fond memories.

Marcia Bailie Plows (66)
Sisters, OR
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