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3/19/02
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PHS Bulldogs On-Line
Mar 19, 2002
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4 Bulldog notes today:
Dave Whitmire (62)
John Garman (63)
Lois Benson Kincaid (64)
William Reinhardt (65)

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From: Dave Whitmire (62)

  Most of us are looked upon as the older generation now by all the kids in school, and rightfully so because we are. Well, maybe not old, but just a little bit seasoned.
  In my travels around our state, as well as a few others, I always like to go by the elementary schools to see if any of the old games that we grew up with are being played today. I have seen "Red Rover Red Rover." At least it looked like it because one kid was running into a bunch of other kids that were holding hands.
  I didn't see anyone playing "work-up" and there wasn't any "hopscotch" being played either. The number one thing that wasn't being played any place at all was "Marbles." Does anyone remember the marbles you would bring to school in a bag of some sort or an old sock if you couldn't afford a bag? Do you remember the types of marbles? How about "cats-eyes," "corkie's," "steelies," "boulders" and the like. Anyone could have plain old marbles, but to have a "cats-eye" meant you were "BAD."
  I can remember at Whittier running as fast as humanly possible to get to the best flat dirt area on the playground to draw a circle with my foot or a stick so that we could play. A real big circle was drawn during lunch recess because we had longer to play and more guys would be able to join in the fun.
  I remember the first time that I went up against a kid with a "steelie." He cleaned me out during morning recess. After that, I went on a vision quest to get a steelie. (I didn't know it was a ball-bearing. When one is six, one just thinks it is a steel marble.)
  My Brother Ken, Class of `59, `60, and the first half of `61, was the marbles champ at Whittier. If it hadn't been for him, I wouldn't have played again after the "steelie" kid incident. He loaned me 30 marbles to play with, and that got me back in the game. I was always grateful to him for that.
  Anybody remember "Mumblie-Peg?" In today's school, one would be arrested for possession of a deadly weapon.
  What was the name of the game where one would stand face to face with somebody else about six feet apart and then throw one's pocketknife into the grass? If it stuck in the grass the opponent would have to put his foot where it stuck. Each person would rotate turns, and when you couldn't stretch any further or you fell down the game was over. (Another fun game lost forever. Probably for the best.) I remember more than once having my shoe take a great deal of punishment.
  Just remembering some very good times during a wonderful time to be young and growing up.

Dave Whitmire (62)
Olympia, WA
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From: John Garman (63)

  I also sold spudnuts for a couple summers. My route was downtown Kennewick. If I remember right Doyle Clapper drove the van that dropped us off and he wouldn't let us back in it we didn't sell them all.

John Garman (63)
Spokane, WA
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From: Lois Benson Kincaid (64)

  Hey all you Bulldogs out there - I will be introducing Doc Hastings at a meeting in Moses Lake in April. Does anyone have a funny story that is "Bulldog and/or PHS related" that I could use? Thanks.

Lois Benson Kincaid (64)
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From: William Reinhardt (65)

  If we sold all of our Spudnuts every week, which we always did, we were allowed to have a cheeseburger and mix our own sodas on Saturday. My routes were in parts of Pasco, the Angus village part of Kennewick, and Burbank. I met some EXTREMELY interesting people going door to door; also, some very trusting ones. I'll always remember the woman who trustingly gave me a twenty dollar bill, and told me to bring her the change on my way back on the other side of the street. ON an average we probably earned $6.50 a week. This was in 1962, I think.

William Reinhardt (65)
Portland, OR
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